Brown Anole

Brown anoles are an invasive species which have effectively displaced their native green kin in many sub-arboreal habitats throughout Florida. This fellow is performing a territorial display. Photo taken at Lake Louisa State Park, FL, USA.
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Green Anole

Green anoles are only actually green when they're feeling healthy and confident. They turn brown when encountering a predator, but when it's feeling extra brazen, a male might go as far as to perform territorial "push-ups," while puffing out his red dewlap (throat). Photo taken at Lake Louisa State Park, FL, USA.
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Zebra-Tailed Lizard

This enormous zebra-tailed lizard had an even bigger ego. Upon my approach for a close shot, rather than fleeing, this brazen lizard decided to make a territorial display. He looks rather human in this shot. Saguaro NP East, AZ.
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Festive Ameiva

Hyperactive, terrestrial hunters, festive ameivas never seem to slow down as they scour the jungle floor for insects and spiders. Dos Brazos de Osa, Costa Rica.
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Horned Lizard Pose

Perhaps one of the most interesting reptiles of the American Southwest, Horned Lizards survive entirely on a diet of ants and, as a defense mechanism, can shoot blood from their eyes. Lake Roberts, NM, USA.
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Desert Iguana

Using it's tail as a stilt, this desert iguana manages to balance in the lower creosote branches. It's enjoying a favorite dish, the creosote's delicious flowers. Saguaro NP West, AZ.
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Banded Gecko

An extremely common, yet (due to their small size and nocturnal habits) rarely encountered lizard, the banded is Arizona's only native gecko. Picture Rocks, AZ, USA.
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Desert Spiny Lizard

Not unlike humans, the male gender of many lizard species are rather territorial. One of the many ways that some lizards (such as this Desert Spiny Lizard) show their bravado is by performing territorial "push-ups." This fellow's brazen masculinity (combined with the palo verde flowers) made for an excellent photo op! Tucson, AZ, USA.
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Greater Earless Lizard

Greater Earless Lizard, striking the perfect pose to have his picture taken. Photo taken at Rockhound State Park, NM, USA.
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Mediterranean Gecko

Mediterranean House Gecko found in my backyard, a bit far from home. These tiny geckos have successfully established themselves in Phoenix, Tucson, and a number of other metropolitan areas in warmer parts of America. Interestingly enough, this area's climate is pretty similar to that of their home range, making for an ideal match. Despite their success, this species doesn't appear to be having a negative impact on native species. This may be largely due to their presence strictly in/around cities, as well as their arboreal / nocturnal niche, one that seems to be largely unoccupied by local species of lizards. Picture Rocks, AZ.
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Fighting Whiptails

These tiger whiptails were having a heated territorial dispute when I happened upon them. Tucson, AZ, USA.
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A Zebra-Print Tail

Proudly showing off his bold breeding colors, this zebra-tailed lizard actually ran toward me, prior to having his picture taken. Saguaro National Park West, AZ, USA.
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Cold-blooded but rarely clammy, reptiles are represented by such models as turtles, snakes, crocodilians, and lizards.  When watching a large iguana basking on a rock, it’s easy to see the dinosaur ancestry (despite the types of changes that result from millions of years of evolution).  Alligators and crocodiles, on the other hand, are nearly pristine replicas of their pre-historic lineage.  Although much more commonly encountered in the tropics and deserts, some extremely well-adjusted reptile species can be found well into the arctic circle.  This album features many shapes, sizes, and colors of lizards from the tropics, swamps, and wetlands of the Western Hemisphere.